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PostHeaderIcon Slimming Down Shortcut: Getting A Gastric Bypass

Would you like to find out what those-in-the-know have to say about Gastric Bypass? The information in the article below comes straight from well-informed experts with special knowledge about Gastric Bypass.

It’s been quite noticeable in some celebrities: the sudden weight loss and return to a svelte figure is often touted to the result of liposuction or a lot of dedication in the gym. But there are some celebrities that have gone that extra mile and had a gastric bypass. That may sound like some sort of heavy surgical procedure but it’s actually one of the more easy to handle weight-loss surgeries.

Getting a gastric bypass is a pretty simple process – you just have to go to your local hospital and consult with a surgeon. They obviously won’t just let you have one willy-nilly, of course, there are several guidelines that limit the administering of a gastric bypass procedure to someone. The main things that restrict any prospective recepient of the procedure are the following: the patient must have been obese for more than five years, the patient must also not have a history of alcoholism and psychological disorders.

Finally, the person should not be younger than eighteen years old and no older than sixty-five years old. If you fit all of these categories, you’ll also be judged if you have exhausted all other weight-loss measures for yourself. This is because it may be one of the safer surgeries that can be done, a gastric bypass is still a major operation and cannot be taken lightly.

The best time to learn about Gastric Bypass is before you’re in the thick of things. Wise readers will keep reading to earn some valuable Gastric Bypass experience while it’s still free.

If you do pass all of these tests, then you’ll be up for the procedure. Here’s a simple explanation of it: it is essentially, having your stomach capacity lessened and making your digestive tract skip a part of your small intestine. To go into the nitty-gritty of it, the procedure creates a small pouch in the upper part of your stomach, usually via surgical staples or a plastic band. This stomach pouch is usually small – it can get to the size a walnut for some procedures. After this pouch is created, the middle of your small intestine, the jejunum, is connected to it. This means your food will skip the main part of your stomach and your duodenum, the upper portion of your small intestine. The result is lower stomach capacity and a lower calorie intake. You will be able to satisfy your appetite more quickly and have less calories inside your system, creating a consistent and quick weight loss for you until your body has adapted to it.

It may sound easy but still it’s a long road after a gastric bypass. After the four-hour operation you will be under observation for the next few days, while being limited to liquids only so that your stomach can heal. After five days you can be released from the hospital but your ordeal won’t end there. For the next twelve weeks, you will be following a diet that will slowly progress you from liquids to solids, getting you new stomach used to the strain.

Even then, you will have to deal with some of the side-effects your whole life – lower energy intake can be detrimental to your health, while over-eating can cause you to vomit or feel great pain, so a gastric bypass should be a last resort for anyone who’s suffering from obesity.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his Perpetual20 training site for great bonuses: Perpetual20

PostHeaderIcon Thinning Down: Do You Need A Gastric Bypass For It?

Imagine the next time you join a discussion about Gastric Bypass. When you start sharing the fascinating Gastric Bypass facts below, your friends will be absolutely amazed.

Obesity is an increasing problem in the world today. It can’t be avoided because of our current environment of fast food and sedentary lifestyles. So what can you do about your ever-expanding flab?There’s always the constant call for exercise and dieting – however, sometimes even that is not enough. This is when surgery comes in and a gastric bypass can be needed.

First of all, let’s talk about what exactly is a gastric bypass. Have you ever heard of a heart bypass? This is when surgeons stitch up you arteries to avoid the clogged vessels of the circulatory system around your heart. This is also what happens in a gastric bypass, although the operation involves your digestive system rather than your blood vessels. What the surgeons do is make your stomach smaller by making a pouch at the top of the stomach. This neatly halves your stomach capacity. Then, the surgeons would connect your small intestine to this pouch, skipping a part of it. These two changes contribute to increased weight loss by lower food capacity and lesser calorie absorption over all. Weight loss would accelerate over a three to six-month period, until your body manages to adapt to the lower energy intake.

The question that most doctors ask before they have someone undergo all of this is very simple: do you really need it? Most doctors advise patients seeking a gastric bypass to exhaust all other forms of weight-loss options before doing this operation. It may be the safest option but it is still major surgery on a sensitive part of your body. These is still a chance for complications to set in both during and after the operation. Doctors also screen any patient wanting to have a gastric bypass – you may not have a gastric bypass if you have not been obese for more than five years, are alcoholic, experiencing a psychiatric disorder and you have to be between 18 to 65 years of age.

The more authentic information about Gastric Bypass you know, the more likely people are to consider you a Gastric Bypass expert. Read on for even more Gastric Bypass facts that you can share.

If the patient has exhausted all other options and is eligible for a bypass then the doctor outlines exactly what happens after the bypass is done. After the surgery, the patient will stay in observation for the next three days to check for complications. He won’t be eating anything solid for awhile to let the pouch in his stomach heal. After discharge, he will also be under a rigid, progressive diet that would take him from liquid foods to solid foods in twelve weeks. The patient will also be experiencing the effects of lower energy intake: headaches and bodyaches, along with lower energy levels.

He will also have to take vitamin supplements since the part of the small intestine that is being skipped by the bypass is predominantly in charge of getting the appropriate vitamins and minerals from the food – not all, of course, but a significant portion of the recommended daily allowance. The long-term effects are also there. A lower stomach capacity means you may vomit or feel abdominal pains if you eat too much or too fast.

It sounds extreme, but still, a lot of gastric bypasses are done each year – it’s up to you to decide whether it is worth the risk.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, now offering the host then profit baby plan for only $1 over at Host Then Profit

PostHeaderIcon Slimming Down Shortcut: Getting A Gastric Bypass

It’s been quite noticeable in some celebrities: the sudden weight loss and return to a svelte figure is often touted to the result of liposuction or a lot of dedication in the gym. But there are some celebrities that have gone that extra mile and had a gastric bypass. That may sound like some sort of heavy surgical procedure but it’s actually one of the more easy to handle weight-loss surgeries.

Getting a gastric bypass is a pretty simple process – you just have to go to your local hospital and consult with a surgeon. They obviously won’t just let you have one willy-nilly, of course, there are several guidelines that limit the administering of a gastric bypass procedure to someone. The main things that restrict any prospective recepient of the procedure are the following: the patient must have been obese for more than five years, the patient must also not have a history of alcoholism and psychological disorders.

Finally, the person should not be younger than eighteen years old and no older than sixty-five years old. If you fit all of these categories, you’ll also be judged if you have exhausted all other weight-loss measures for yourself. This is because it may be one of the safer surgeries that can be done, a gastric bypass is still a major operation and cannot be taken lightly.

If you find yourself confused by what you’ve read to this point, don’t despair. Everything should be crystal clear by the time you finish.

If you do pass all of these tests, then you’ll be up for the procedure. Here’s a simple explanation of it: it is essentially, having your stomach capacity lessened and making your digestive tract skip a part of your small intestine. To go into the nitty-gritty of it, the procedure creates a small pouch in the upper part of your stomach, usually via surgical staples or a plastic band. This stomach pouch is usually small – it can get to the size a walnut for some procedures. After this pouch is created, the middle of your small intestine, the jejunum, is connected to it. This means your food will skip the main part of your stomach and your duodenum, the upper portion of your small intestine. The result is lower stomach capacity and a lower calorie intake. You will be able to satisfy your appetite more quickly and have less calories inside your system, creating a consistent and quick weight loss for you until your body has adapted to it.

It may sound easy but still it’s a long road after a gastric bypass. After the four-hour operation you will be under observation for the next few days, while being limited to liquids only so that your stomach can heal. After five days you can be released from the hospital but your ordeal won’t end there. For the next twelve weeks, you will be following a diet that will slowly progress you from liquids to solids, getting you new stomach used to the strain.

Even then, you will have to deal with some of the side-effects your whole life – lower energy intake can be detrimental to your health, while over-eating can cause you to vomit or feel great pain, so a gastric bypass should be a last resort for anyone who’s suffering from obesity.

It never hurts to be well-informed with the latest on Gastric Bypass. Compare what you’ve learned here to future articles so that you can stay alert to changes in the area of Gastric Bypass.

About the Author
Monica Flower likes to take courses about floral arrangements. Discover the secrets of flower arrangements by visiting www.flower-arranging-courses.net, a blog about top flower arranging courses and best flower arranging classes.

PostHeaderIcon What You Gain and Lose from Gastric Bypass Surgery

Obesity is a serious health problem across the globe. That is why a number of methods, techniques, and technologies have been developed to help curb weight problems that usually lead to life-threatening diseases such as heart ailments and diabetes. One of the most popular weight loss strategies is gastric bypass surgery, a procedure that alters the digestive system (particularly the stomach) to restrain a person’s food intake.

The results of the surgery are immediate—a patient may lose 50 to 60 percent of his weight within two years following the surgery. With healthy lifestyle (including proper diet and regular exercise), one can expect weight loss in the long run after the surgery. Those who are overweight will experience easier mobility and better quality of life after undergoing weight loss surgery.

But there’s more to this surgery than just weight loss. Aside from slashing off some figures from the weighing scale, the surgery also helps improve certain conditions that are often linked to obesity. These health problems include high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, sleep apnea, high blood cholesterol, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Thus, people who have gone through weight loss surgery are less likely to develop cardiovascular problems than those who have not tried the procedure. Also, the surgery can lessen a patient’s possibility of death due to heart ailment, diabetes, or cancer.

Now for the not-so good news. Weight loss surgery is not for the faint of hearts. As with other kinds of surgeries, weight loss surgery leads to several complications. If you will go through this procedure, you need to know the risks before you head over the clinic or hospital. Being aware of what to expect after the surgery helps a lot in your recovery process. The most common complications of the surgery include infection, bleeding, and swelling. Other complications are ulcer, low blood sugar, kidney stones, gallstones, iron deficiency anemia, and vitamin D and B-12 deficiency. After the operation, a patient may also experience vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, and dizziness especially when eating foods rich in sugar and fat. These are caused by a condition called dumping syndrome in which the contents of the stomach pass through the small intestine very fast.

There are certain postoperative risks that occur in rare cases but are severe and need immediate medical attention. The following are some of the complications and tips on how to deal with them.

1. Leak in the stomach

You may not consider everything you just read to be crucial information about Gastric Bypass. But don’t be surprised if you find yourself recalling and using this very information in the next few days.

This is found at one of the staple lines in the stomach. The leak heals over time in most cases, though it can be treated using antibiotics. But severe cases require immediate surgery.

2. Thinning of the opening between the small intestine and stomach

This condition needs either a corrective surgery or a simple outpatient procedure wherein a tube is inserted through the mouth to make the opening wider.

3. Incision hernia or weakness in the incision

This complication happens if the surgery is an open procedure that involves a large incision on the abdomen. Incision hernia needs to be repaired through surgery depending on the severity of the condition.

4. Death

For every 200 to 300 weight loss surgeries, one case results in death. Although the risk of death has been linked to gastric bypass surgery, it still depends on many factors such as age and health and medical conditions.

About the Author
Monica Flower likes to take courses about floral arrangements. Discover the secrets of flower arrangements by visiting www.flower-arranging-courses.net, a blog about top flower arranging courses and best flower arranging classes.

PostHeaderIcon Top 10 Tips for Success after Gastric Bypass Surgery

The more you understand about any subject, the more interesting it becomes. As you read this article you’ll find that the subject of Gastric Bypass is certainly no exception.

Gastric bypass surgery is a weight loss procedure that results in major changes not only in the body, but also in one’s lifestyle. To be able to adapt well to those changes, a patient needs to bear in mind these guidelines that ensure success after the surgery. Success means maintaining a healthy weight and preventing the possibility of regaining weight.

1. Avoid foods that are not nutritious. The culprits for weight gain are foods and liquids that are rich in calories, fat, and sugar. These include soda, milk shakes, alcohol, and sugar-rich desserts. These foods do not provide nutrients; instead, they cause hunger pangs and vomiting. Avoid them so that you do not out your weight loss effort to waste. Make sure that your diet is rich in protein, and include lots of fruits and vegetables.

2. Avoid foods that cause discomfort. Sticky, dry, and fibrous foods such as pasta, rice, bread, and meat are usually a no-no for bypass surgery patients. Soda is also not allowed because it causes bloating, gas pain, and even pressure in the stomach.

3. Avoid snacking between meals. This will only hurt your chances of keeping a healthy weight.

4. Avoid drinking liquids immediately before, during, or after meals. Filling your stomach with liquids instead of foods will deprive you of your much-needed nutrients for healing and recovery. Be sure to drink fluids at least 30 minutes before and after your meals. And of course, avoid drinking fluids while eating meals.

5. Refrain from drinking alcoholic and caffeinated drinks. Alcohol does more harm than good for people who have gone through weight loss surgery. Devoid of calories, alcohol can cause stomach ulcers. Caffeine have the same effect, aside from working against hydration in the body.

You can see that there’s practical value in learning more about Gastric Bypass. Can you think of ways to apply what’s been covered so far?

6. Contact your surgeon if problems arise. If you experience one or more of the following problems, call your surgeon immediately: extreme pain in the legs, shortness or difficulty of breathing, fever, bleeding of the incisions, and dark stools.

7. Maintain your follow-up visits after the surgery. This will make it easier for you and your surgeon to monitor and assess your progress. Also, this will result in early detection of problems such as surgical complications and nutritional deficiencies.

8. Keep yourself from getting pregnant for two years following surgery. Because your body is undergoing weight months after the surgery, it may not be able to support a baby. This will be unhealthy for both of you and the fetus. Ask your surgeon for advice in case you plan on getting pregnant.

9. Join a support group. Coping with the aftermath of the surgery may be much easier if you do it with the help of other people. There are many support groups formed to provide emotional support and advice for people who have undergone weight loss surgery. Search for these groups on the Internet; for sure, you can find one within or near your locality.

10. Find ways to cope with stress. Stress usually leads to comfort eating, which is not good for people who have had weight loss surgery. Listen to your favorite music, read books, meet up with friends, and do whatever you can to effectively deal with stress.

You will get the best results from gastric bypass surgery if you follow the guidelines mentioned above.

About the Author
Bob Roberts,ex PE teacher, did not start playing golf until he was well into his 50′s but now plays two to three times a week. He knows the pitfalls a beginner faces and has written two websites targeted mainly at high handicap golfers. For more information about his tips for golf go here===> Start Playing Golf and Tips For Golf

PostHeaderIcon Gastric Bypass Surgery: How much does it Cost?

This article explains a few things about Gastric Bypass, and if you’re interested, then this is worth reading, because you can never tell what you don’t know.

Are you considering gastric bypass surgery to get rid of excess weight? Perhaps, you are wondering how much the procedure would cost you and if it is covered by insurance.

Prepare to spend much to be able to lose weight. Nowadays, weight loss or bariatric surgery costs around $20,000 to $35,000. In fact, the cost of weight loss surgery has gone down significantly in the past years. It varies depending on the quality of procedure itself, the experience of the surgeon, the medical team that will help in the operation, and the additional post-surgery services that a patient availed of.

Insurance Coverage for Weight Loss Surgery Patients

Is the cost of weight loss surgery covered by insurance companies? If a patient has insurance, he may pay part of the cost or nothing at all. A lot of health insurance companies have considered obesity as a serious health problem, so they cover part of or all the expenses incurred in weight loss surgery. This is because weight loss surgery can actually save them money in the long term. Insurance coverage for weight loss surgery depends on the insurance firm itself, the particular insurance policy, and the state where the patient is located (since there is no insurance coverage in some states). Also, insurance coverage is given only to qualified candidates or those who meet specific criteria set by an insurance company.

The following are the criteria that a weight loss surgery patient must meet to qualify for insurance coverage:

• Obesity for at least five years before the surgery

• Minimum of 100 lbs. of excess weight

• Showed serious efforts to lose weight through diet and exercise but to no avail

Think about what you’ve read so far. Does it reinforce what you already know about Gastric Bypass? Or was there something completely new? What about the remaining paragraphs?

• No history of alcoholism

• No history of depression or other mental disorders

To be able to enjoy the insurance benefits, the patient (with the help of the surgeon or clinic) is required to file some forms to the insurance company. One of the necessary forms include a Letter of Medical Necessity that usually indicates the patient’s weight or body mass index, obesity-related diseases (e.g., diabetes, hypertension, etc.), and the duration of the patient’s obesity, among others.

On the other hand, weight loss surgery patients who are not covered by insurance must shoulder the costs themselves. These self-pay patients may apply for personal loans to be able to pay for the surgery, but this payment option involves interest rates.

Post-Surgery Costs

The cost of weight loss surgery must also include the expenses following the procedure. A change in lifestyle after the surgery results in certain expenses such as gym membership for the exercises and new sets of clothes, which will need to be replaced several times during the year.

Besides the financial costs, there are emotional and physical costs involved as well in the weight loss surgery. For one, the patient will need to adjust to the new lifestyle and the changes in his body, which can trigger high levels of stress and anxiety especially in the few weeks following the surgery. The physical cost of gastric bypass surgery involves being committed to the recommended diet plan to avoid serious complications and weight gain.

In particular, it means the patient must stay away from foods rich in fat and sugar, as well as avoid unhealthy habits such as skipping meals and overeating. Sticking to a regular exercise program is also part of the surgery’s physical cost.

This article’s coverage of the information is as complete as it can be today. But you should always leave open the possibility that future research could uncover new facts.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his Perpetual20 training site for great bonuses: Perpetual20

PostHeaderIcon Losing Weight The Easy Way: A Gastric Bypass

Getting a gastric bypass seems to have become somewhat of a choice these days. Nowadays, there’s an increasing desire for that perfect body. Images of slim, toned bodies bombard us daily on every media outlet. The thing is, having that perfect body won’t just help you catch the eyes of everyone but also help out your health big-time. Obesity is more than just being overweight – it has incredible detrimental effects on your life and weight problems can cause your body trouble down the line. Some of the diseases associated with obesity are: diabetes, hypertension, migraines, and a dozen other liver and heart diseases.

There are a lot of ways to shed all of those unwanted pounds: dieting and exercise are probably two of the simplest and easisest ways to do so. Those two choices only require an investment of some time and discipline to get you to a fighting trim. Unfortunately, sometimes people don’t have the time to do so, or are suffering from conditions that make exercise or dieting a bit of a no-no or, at worst, make these approaches totally ineffectual. So, if you’ve been failed by these options, what are the choices that you have left? Well, there’s surgery.

When we think of weight-loss surgery, we usually think of liposuctions. That would be a complete misrepresentation of the process. Weight-loss surgery is a lot different from weight-reduction surgery, which is what liposuction is – liposuction is actually not even actual surgery. Operations or procedures that reduce weight do only a temporary reduction of your body weight – while weight-loss surgery aims to make changes in your body that would make weight loss a possibility and something that can be maintained. A gastric bypass can do this, as long as it is combined with behavioral changes.

You can see that there’s practical value in learning more about Gastric Bypass. Can you think of ways to apply what’s been covered so far?

What exactly happens during a gastric bypass? Well, in simple terms, a doctor finds a way for your stomach to be made smaller. The complicated explanation is that a doctor creates a small pouch for you near the opening of your stomach and connects that pouch directly to your small intestine – essentially making your food skip over a large part of your stomach and small intestine. This makes it so that you don’t absorb that much calories from your food, and it also makes your stomach hold a lot less food. Less calories and smaller intakes are what essentially drives you to lose weight after a gastric bypass. After the procedure, you’ll be in the hospital for three to five days, though there are some variations of the procedure that make that already short stay, even shorter.

Sounds all right doesn’t it? However, like all surgeries, it is still a major surgical operation that can affect the way you live. It should not be understaken unless it has been fully considered. You won’t be eating anything for three days after the surgery and you’ll be on a strict diet afterwards – eating too much will literally hurt you. Your body adjusting to the lower energy intake also takes its toll.

A gastric bypass is not a miracle cure-all but it can help a lot. So think long and hard before you do it.

So now you know a little bit about Gastric Bypass. Even if you don’t know everything, you’ve done something worthwhile: you’ve expanded your knowledge.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his soon to be top ranked Perpetual20 training site: Perpetual 20

PostHeaderIcon Instant and Long-Term Weight Loss with Gastric Bypass Surgery

Are you looking for some inside information on Gastric Bypass? Here’s an up-to-date report from Gastric Bypass experts who should know.

Want to lose weight but afraid to go under the knife? Listen up. Your long-time battle with the bulge will end for good with one solution—gastric bypass surgery. It involves changing the digestive system to change your appetite; that way, you eat and digest less amount of food. Aside from the significant weight loss, the surgery also helps minimize the risk of developing obesity-related diseases.

Also called the Roux-en-Y surgery, the procedure primarily entails making a walnut-sized pouch at the upper stomach and putting a bypass around a portion of the small intestine and the stomach. Consequently, the food you eat bypasses most of the stomach and restricts the ability of your digestive system to take in calories. Hence, the term “bypass” surgery. Surgeons perform this operation using a small tube called a laparoscope that creates small incisions in the abdomen.

A small video camera is attached on the instrument, and this device enables the surgeon to see the inside of the abdomen. The laparoscopic technique is generally preferred over the traditional open bypass surgery that makes large incisions in the abdomen. Compared to the open bypass surgery, the laparoscopic technique is less risky and less painful because of the small incisions. Also, it results in shorter recovery period.

The procedure starts with the stapling of the patient’s stomach at the top to seal this area off from the rest of the stomach. As a result, the sealed portion or the pouch will be able to contain only an ounce of food. Separated from the entire stomach, the pouch is then connected to a small part of the small intestine. To be able to achieve that, the surgeon cuts a small part of the small intestine and sews it onto the pouch.

Sometimes the most important aspects of a subject are not immediately obvious. Keep reading to get the complete picture.

The surgery is not for everyone, though. There are certain risks involved; and a prospective patient must understand them before undergoing the surgery. If you plan to undergo the weight loss surgery, consult a surgeon and ask all your concerns regarding the procedure. Usually, the surgeon explains the things you should expect during and after the surgery.

Before the surgery, you will be given anesthetics to keep you asleep during the operation. The anesthesia is usually in the form of an intravenous (IV) line or analgesics. During the procedure, the surgeon inserts a tube into your nose down to the top of the stomach. To heal the staple line on the stomach, the tube is joined to a suction machine that empties the stomach pouch after the surgery. The surgery lasts for about two to four hours, but you will need to stay in the hospital for around three to five days for recovery.

Expect some diet and lifestyle changes after the weight loss surgery. One to three days after the procedure, you will not eat anything to allow your stomach to heal. Then, for about three months, you will follow a diet that starts with liquids, progresses to soft and pureed foods, and lastly to regular foods. You will have to be cautious with your food intake because eating huge meals can cause extreme pain under the breastbone and vomiting.

Also, you will notice some changes in your body and behavior three to six months after the gastric bypass surgery. These include dry skin, hair thinning, fatigue, body pains, and mood swings. These will be your body’s reactions to the quick weight loss resulting from the surgery.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his soon to be top ranked Perpetual20 training site: Perpetual 20

PostHeaderIcon How Gastric Bypass Works

If you have even a passing interest in the topic of Gastric Bypass, then you should take a look at the following information. This enlightening article presents some of the latest news on the subject of Gastric Bypass.

Gastric bypass surgeries and other weight loss medical procedures being performed in the United States are increasing for the last few years. This may be in response for the increase in the number of people suffering from obesity. According to the American Society of Bariatric Surgery, there are about 140,000 gastric bypass being performed every year.

Those who have undergone weight loss surgeries, lose about 50 to 60% of their body weight, a year after the surgery. Along with the weight loss, they would also be losing ailments associated with obesity like high blood pressure, diabetes, stroke, heart diseases and even cancer.

The Procedure

The most common gastric bypass performed is called the Roux-en Y gastric bypass. In this procedure, a small pouch is created on the top of the stomach. It is stapled, to seal it off from the rest of the stomach. This small pouch will no longer digest any food. The upper part of the small intestine, the duodenum, is attached to this small pouch.

When eating, the food would bypass the small pouch in the stomach and the upper portion of the small intestine. The food would go directly to the middle section of the intestine called the jejunum. Since it is the small intestine that does the absorption of minerals, vitamins and calories, the body will absorb limited calories only. A Y formation is formed just below the stomach.

Is everything making sense so far? If not, I’m sure that with just a little more reading, all the facts will fall into place.

Incisions are made in the abdomen to perform the procedure. Surgeons will be using the laparoscope or a small, tubular instrument with a camera. This will enable the surgeon to see the abdomen and perform the surgery. The laparoscopic gastric bypass actually makes the stay in the hospital and the recovery period shorter and quicker.

There are still “open” gastric bypass performed, however, there could be wound-related problems with this kind of procedure. The laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery is performed under general anaesthesia. The procedure lasts for about four hours. Patients who have undergone the procedure stay in the hospital for about two to six days to be monitored for any complications.

After the Surgery

Having a smaller stomach has effects on how much food the patient can eat. There are special diets that a patient recovering from gastric bypass surgery follows. Every food that the patient would eat will be important for his nutrition. There are times that they are also recommended nutritional supplements to avoid deficiencies like anemia or vitamin deficiency.

There are patients reporting weight loss of as much as 50 to 60 percent a year after the surgery. There are even some who would report an astounding 80% weight loss. However, it is still possible for patients to stretch their stomachs and have that large size again. There is still a possibility of getting back those lost pounds. That is why doctors would recommend dietary restrictions and exercise plant that would keep the pounds away.

There are also tendencies that gastric bypass patients would develop gallstones, stomach ulcers, hernia or nutritional deficiencies. The part of the stomach which was bypassed can get enlarged, it could cause bloating and hiccups. There is also the Dumping syndrome which happens when the food moves quickly to the small intestine. This can happen after eating foods high in sugar or fat.

There’s no doubt that the topic of Gastric Bypass can be fascinating. If you still have unanswered questions about Gastric Bypass, you may find what you’re looking for in the next article.

About the Author
Monica Flower likes to take courses about floral arrangements. Discover the secrets of flower arrangements by visiting www.flower-arranging-courses.net, a blog about top flower arranging courses and best flower arranging classes.

PostHeaderIcon Getting A Gastric Bypass: Desperate Times Call For Desperate Measures

If you have even a passing interest in the topic of Gastric Bypass, then you should take a look at the following information. This enlightening article presents some of the latest news on the subject of Gastric Bypass.

Why get a gastric bypass? It sometimes goes like this: you’ve been looking at yourself in the mirror and are looking at all the flab on you? Have you been laying awake all night as you remember your physical difficulties during the day? Life isn’t exactly when you’re overweight and a lot of people try to rid themselves of the fat on their body. The problem is sometimes alll those exercise programs and diets don’t exactly work out for those doing them. What do you do when your weight yo-yos up and down or, worse, it just won’t go down?

Well, that’s the time when you think about getting a surgical option. Liposuctions are a good stopgap option and they can often do the trick – all it takes is a good push and maintaining weight is a lot easier. However, sometimes even that is not enough. The fat keeps on coming back, whether it’s just a genetic predesposition to it or something similar. Some people really need help to get them out of obesity’s tight embrace. That’s where a gastric bypass comes in.

A gastric bypass, or as medical professionals call it a “Roux-en-Y gastric bypass”, is a surgical weight-loss procedure that enables the patient to lose weight on a constant and regular basis. It is one of the more safe options and is because of this the preferred option when any weight-loss surgery is being considered. What it does is essentially make a small pouch in the upper part of the stomach, and connect it directly to the middle of your small intestine. This severely cuts down on your caloric intake by skipping most of the intestinal tract and also reduces your appetite by making your stomach handle less food.

Now that we’ve covered those aspects of Gastric Bypass, let’s turn to some of the other factors that need to be considered.

The procedure may sound like an easy thing but a gastric bypass is still a major surgical operation and has its own risks. You’ll be under general anesthesia for this operation and tubes will be inserted via your nose and your abdomen to make sure you recover completely after the operation. The operation itself will only take a few hours.

It may even be shorter if you under go a laparoscopic bypass, a procedure which uses a laparoscope instead of opening your abdomen completely for the operation. This results in less infection and accelerates healing time. After the operation, your doctor will probably keep you in the hospital for three to five days for observation.

Of course, immediately after the operation you will be experiencing a few changes. First of all, in the first three days after the bypass, you’ll be on an IV drip – no eating until your stomach heals. Then it’s twelve weeks of reginemnted diet as you progress to solid foods again. You’ll also be feeling the effects of the gastric bypass. When you eat a lot of food or eat quickly, it may cause you to vomit or pain. You will feel yourself losing weight in the next few months but will also have to suffer the side-effects like weakness, hair loss and body aches.

This is why you should never undertake a gastric bypass unless it’s truly necessary.

Hopefully the sections above have contributed to your understanding of Gastric Bypass. Share your new understanding about Gastric Bypass with others. They’ll thank you for it.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, proud owner of this top ranked web hosting reseller site: GVO