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PostHeaderIcon Robbing someones Credibility

Identity theft in a broad sense covers many categories in courtroom battles. When identity theft is set for trial, this is no ordinary stealing of one’s number, or mere misrepresentation of some data common to salespeople, neither for the reason of lying, commonly mistaken as fraud for easier grounds to legal access.

Rather, it is the criminal deeds about the theft done by deception behind that stealing, misrepresentations, or lying. Identity theft and fraud is perfect combination to create a sophisticated crime in the immigration, espionage, frame up a crime, access to somebody else’s finances for economic gains. Identity theft and fraud is worst than plain robbing of any material goods, or common personal belongings.

Notorious criminals gaining control over important data of checking accounts, credit cards, social security, telephone numbers, passwords to either website or bank accounts, certainly will create havoc. Aside from using influence over one’s name thru purported deceptions, he will continue committing bad actions under one’s name to destroy long-established good reputation. Identity theft and fraud is one bundle of gigantic crime package that could start with a solicitous demand of one’s social security, or telephone number.

From there on, a criminal goes on manipulating to get further data from the victim’s trusted relatives and immediate family. Hands-on criminals never cease at one victim, unless they devour them, whole into his system. Once access is gained, will continue to finish with him rather than get started with another.

Common Ways to Evade Being a Victim of Identity Fraud:

1. It’s a rare case that someone will ask you about your middle initial (mother’s surname), if it happens, never divulge it. Obviously, banks or other financial management companies have already put them on records, and another attempt to get thru the like data is certainly created by somebody else’s, other than where your inputs are.

Truthfully, the only difference between you and Identity Theft experts is time. If you’ll invest a little more time in reading, you’ll be that much nearer to expert status when it comes to Identity Theft.

2. Be careful not to throw away your returned checks on paid billings from your paying banks. There might be scavengers loitering around for the purpose of following up garbage to get checking account numbers, and other data.

3. Originally approved Credit Cards, or renewals of the same, may be delivered by servicemen who may try to get your personal data that are not commonly asked, such as birthdays, or expiry dates of your card. Refrain from it, instead, tell them to send you a written message, bearing the letterhead of the originating office that they need it, to add to your resume.

4. Never endorse any possible letter in your mailbox, if you go on vacation unless to a trusted friend or relative. Your letter bearing your address might not get into your hands at all, bits of essential information, leaked instead.

5. Always be aware if you’re on call at a public telephone, somebody else may over hear you if you are transmitting some confidential matters concerning your personal identity.

Of course, no matter how careful, or effectively oriented a person may be, at times things just happen inevitably, or without much awareness. A possible victim of identity theft and fraud has only these offices to go in order to minimize further damage to his finances, reputation and disadvantage to his economy.

• Contact by all means the FTC (Federal Trade Commission), and report the case immediately.

About the Author
Bob Roberts,ex PE teacher, did not start playing golf until he was well into his 50′s but now plays two to three times a week. He knows the pitfalls a beginner faces and has written two websites targeted mainly at high handicap golfers. For more information about his tips for golf go here===> Start Playing Golf and Tips For Golf

PostHeaderIcon Protecting Identity is More Than Protecting Individuality

The following paragraphs summarize the work of Identity Theft experts who are completely familiar with all the aspects of Identity Theft. Heed their advice to avoid any Identity Theft surprises.

Do you remember that Hollywood blockbuster several years ago involving a woman that needed to keep running because of a compromised identity with information taken from the Internet? Or more recently, there was yet another Hollywood offering that shows a regular family man’s ideal home and family turned into a suspense-filled arena for a bank heist because of sensitive information gathered from the family trash?

Although, as the disclaimer at the end of these films say, these stories are fictitious, there is indeed cause for alarm for things like these happening to you. Identity theft is a growing problem and once you’ve been victimized, a whole slew of difficulties will arise from this crisis.

Don’t panic just yet though. Note that from these movies you will see that these types of identity thefts are done with precision and motive. Meaning, when identity theft to that magnitude happens, it is usually committed by someone who knows your personal habits and may not be a serial identity theft. That means, you need to safe guard against friends or family that may have a drug problem or are in dire financial straits. Suspicious of you to think this way sure but as the cliché goes, it is better to be safe than sorry, and believe me, sorry is the least of your worries if you become the hapless victim of identity theft.

Just think-if your wallet was stolen or you have for one reason or another, been physically separated from items that contain sensitive information like your social security number, credit card information, driver’s license number, etc– it is easy to prevent identity theft because you can cancel all your cards and report them stolen to prevent anyone misusing your personal information for their gain.

Now imagine this-you are hounded by credit collectors for purchases you have not made, or worse-you are wrongfully apprehended for a crime you most certainly did not commit. How did this happen? Your personal information and sensitive numbers were never physically separated from you. Unfortunately, carelessly giving away your social security number or other sensitive information may put you at risk for identity theft.

See how much you can learn about Identity Theft when you take a little time to read a well-researched article? Don’t miss out on the rest of this great information.

A database with all your information may be sold to another entity that may use your data to make purchases in your stead without you knowing. It’s easy enough if the criminals who commit identity theft will make purchases on your existing credit cards and such. You can easily check your existing credit cards and see fraudulent purchases.

What about checking the accounts that you don’t know about?

Identity thefts may open new accounts for mobile phones, credit cards and even make larger purchases like buying an apartment and you won’t know it unless the credit collectors finally trace the bills back to you after the perpetrators run off with the bills.

Therefore, identity theft protection is important, as you have now surmised. Although as in everything in life (another cliché coming), prevention is the best cure. Given this, it is important to find out the best ways to prevent and protect yourself against identity theft. Fortunately, you can get extremely useful information on this online through websites like www.crimedoctor.com

This website is a rich resource for anything and everything about identity theft and how to protect yourself against it. This site has a very useful article on identity theft written for lay people like you and me so that you can guard yourself by learning more.

About the Author
Monica Flower likes to take courses about floral arrangements. Discover the secrets of flower arrangements by visiting www.flower-arranging-courses.net, a blog about top flower arranging courses and best flower arranging classes.

PostHeaderIcon How to Protect Yourself From Identity Theft

Have you ever wondered if what you know about Identity Theft is accurate? Consider the following paragraphs and compare what you know to the latest info on Identity Theft.

A lot of people seem to be getting worried about the rampant occurrence of identity theft. Many and many people seem to be becoming victims of such a growing threat. What exactly is identity theft and how can it do damage to our lives? It is becoming more of a problem that requires immediate solutions that can really put a stop to it. In order to be able to do something about it and protect ourselves against it, we must first be able to understand what it is.

Identity theft happens when someone you do not know begins using your personal information for fraud and other crimes without your knowledge. Criminals can get it in a variety of ways. They can steal your personal information form your credit records. They can also get it from your credit and bank statements that come by mail.

Your identity can also be stolen by simply getting your credit card number or your signature that appears on it. Criminals can do a number of by making use of your Social Security number. They can also get hold of your personal information by hacking it out on the Internet.

Criminals can do a lot of things once they steal your personal information. With your credit card records, they may be able to call your credit card issuer and make arrangements to change your billing address. Once it is done, they can then charge purchases on your account without you knowing it.

Think about what you’ve read so far. Does it reinforce what you already know about Identity Theft? Or was there something completely new? What about the remaining paragraphs?

And because your billing statements are being sent to a different address, it may take some time before you become aware that someone is using your card. Criminals may also be able to open up new accounts on your name and use it without paying the bills. You will realize this as a problem when the delinquent accounts turn up on your credit report.

Criminals can also establish a phone and wireless service in your name and use it as their own. They can also open new bank accounts and write bad checks on it. They can take out a loan under your name and even get new identification cards with your name but with their picture. They can also go as far as using your name to the police if they get arrested.

And in case they do not show up in court during the legal proceedings, a warrant of arrest can be issued on your name and sent to your home for a crime that you have no idea about. You can see how difficult it can be having your identity stolen. Damaging and costly consequences await any victim.

If you need protection from identity theft, all you will need is look in the mirror. Protecting ourselves from identity theft will primarily depend on us. We must be able to understand that such a problem exists and we must be very careful in giving our personal information to anyone. Our personal information has become one of our very valuable possessions. We should be able to treat it like gold. And in case evidence suggests that someone may have already stolen it, there are steps that you can take to protect yourself from further damage.

For your credit accounts, you can report it to the different fraud agencies who can issue a fraud alert on your account. This alert would notify creditors to contact you every time a new account is being made under your name. You can also have your affected credit accounts closed to stop further violations. Report also your problem to the police as well as the FTC in order to make the necessary legal arrangements and cases in the event that the perpetrators are apprehended.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, now offering the host then profit baby plan for only $1 over at Host Then Profit

PostHeaderIcon Beyond Identity Theft Law

The following article lists some simple, informative tips that will help you have a better experience with Identity Theft.

In a civilized world, having law to condemn felony is a mainstream practice to protect personal freedom of citizens. Every educated, adult knows the concept of universal right and wrong as far as execution of freedom is concerned like the way no one kills to end someone else’s life. As a unique person, freedom means having one identity you claim as yours with ultimate glory. Then one day, you discover someone is using your identity; you freak out: “something is very wrong.”

Identity theft law has been passed with customized decree in every federal state. It will give justice to victims whose pieces of private information are abused carelessly by usurpers. Under the “Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act of 1998,” it defined how it is a crime to make unlawful use of another person’s identification, which is controlled by mandatory requirement to be identified by just using name or Social Security Number.

No matter how many kinds of imposed protection is done to avoid intrusion of privacy through chains of private information through government and non-governmental listings, the problem is sieved by the clever manipulations of the offenders. Free enterprise in the U.S. made this dilemma very rampant in every exchange of business transactions through various means of handling and disseminating cash flow.

Obviously, the best source of private information is through banks and credit cards, where bulks of cash are stored for easy and convenient payment. For unknowing business person, this transgression happens after the theft has successfully caused damage. Identity theft law covers all bounds of these illegal activities through emails, mails and other transaction cards, brokerage, insurance, and other documentations involving membership.

As imposed, identity theft law could penalize villains from 15 to 30 years of imprisonment depending on the degree of fraudulent nuisance done, excluding revoked privileges and forfeiture of assets. Each state has passed legislations to act upon any kind of relevant identity theft cases. Each felony is closely monitored by the federal agency to enforce the law.

Identity theft is a very rampant and not easily toppled crime affecting lives and property of peaceful and law-abiding individuals. Before spending effort on legal suits, why not do preventive measures to avoid waste of time dealing with the consequences of being a helpless victim?

It’s really a good idea to probe a little deeper into the subject of Identity Theft. What you learn may give you the confidence you need to venture into new areas.

The common saying still prevails: “Prevention is better than cure.” It can happen by doing the following measures:

1. Transaction monitoring – this is done by taking care of the reports of your credit billing by requesting yearly low-charged credit reports

2. Use password wisely – those not easily identified by making it remotely related to you.

3. Be wary of strangers in the house by limiting their access to private information you are keeping.

4. Know the people handling your records in the office/workplace. Make sure to verify how they dispose private information and rule out carelessness in exchanging or disclosing them to other people.

No matter how you take care of your information, there are instances where it slipped off your fingers uncontrolled depending on your daily activities. Just like other ancient crimes covered by the penalties imposed by the law, identity theft is personally damaging to one’s integrity. The villains get their share of success because of vile planning in between inefficiency of law enforcement. Don’t let this put you into halt with whatever goals you have. Crime will never pay.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, now offering the host then profit baby plan for only $1 over at Host Then Profit

PostHeaderIcon Prompt Actions Against Identity Thieves

The only way to keep up with the latest about Identity Theft is to constantly stay on the lookout for new information. If you read everything you find about Identity Theft, it won’t take long for you to become an influential authority.

Identity Theft soars high in crime reports at the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTI) and other government bureaucracies; credit report agencies, Forensic Accounting firms, investigators, and other private consortiums to protect victims. Any holder of information identifiers of social security number, credit cards, bank account number, driver’s license, health care, and other financial sources is at risk. Everyone is vulnerable, offline or online. Households, telephone booths, and garbage areas are common places where criminals loiter around to look for their prey. Thieves simply want it the easiest way to earn without exerting much effort.

If a culprit gets into hands-on control of one’s number, it could be a start of a cycle of indefinite crimes against the legitimate owner, would lead the poor victim and his family into rubbles of chaos that can’t easily be repaired. A ruined reputation because of unprecedented debts thru malicious intent of someone would ruin anyone’s credibility, and totally, his life. There’s no way patching it up immediately, for criminals have all pretext to blackmail his victims pestering him further to the police.

If you’re a victim of identity theft, never loose time to research primarily in troubleshooting your problem. It is not easy, for the authorities at times will not listen. Going to agencies to get solutions entails a lot of expense. A victim will be entangled into questions of how, what, who, and where to get thru your complaint, or report. Get proper forms of applications of your complaint at the proper government agency.

Once filed, if its with the FTI, being the leading and core authority to follow-up of credit records trespassing, it has full control to *detect, by way of consistent monitoring of your financial accounts as well as your current billings; *to deter, with caution to safeguard any personal information data under their safekeeping; *defend your identification from any continuous manipulations of the suspected theft.

Think about what you’ve read so far. Does it reinforce what you already know about Identity Theft? Or was there something completely new? What about the remaining paragraphs?

Having lost your credit account to the hands of a thief, you’ll need to hire a Certified Forensic Accountants (CrFA’s), who investigate to the in-depth of the irregularities of your figures in record that affect your monetary condition badly. It composed of CPA’s, CrFA’s, and investigators who will help you in all angles of your financial loss to the offender. Most importantly, it will handle the defenses against any repetition of identity deception.

Generally, federal prosecutors cooperate with various investigating agencies to prosecute any identity theft fraud. These are the FBI, The U.S. Secret Service, and the U.S. Postal Inspection Service.

A lot of paperwork is involved when you are filing your complaint to a definite jurisdiction of theft offense. You’ll need a series of contact files, actual conversations and written messages, discussions at the agency, dates, and witnesses, if there are any. Original copies of all documentations should be included in your files.

Send out to any office or person concerned photocopies only. A summary of what happened should be included in the report. The process is very meticulous and needs ample patience and determination. Ready your self for years of waiting before the offender will be found and proven guilty.

It would be too hard to mend a lost spirit on your part for having lost some of your economic gains that can’t be recovered in years, alongside a weakened morale. Be serious in shielding yourself against identity thieves before becoming their prey.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, proud owner of this top ranked web hosting reseller site: GVO

PostHeaderIcon Tips to Prevent Identity Theft

The time it takes for a victim to recover from identity theft can be extensive, and while the wounds aren’t physical, they are psychological and life-changing in several ways.

Identity theft occurs when someone steals personal information and pretends to be you to obtain credit cards, loans, and even jobs by using your work references.

Identity thieves only need to know your Social Security number, name, and address to wreck your good credit. Using easily accessible public records, they can learn your place of employment, date of birth, and mother’s maiden name. They can open a credit card account and immediately charge up to the limit with no intention of paying.

Credit cards can be obtained through banks and credit unions as well as chain stores. Many offers for “pre-approved” credit cards come in the mail.

Getting a credit card issued by department stores is simple. Only two forms of ID are required: a driver’s license with a picture ID and a second identification, like another credit card or your Social Security card.

What steps should you take to protect your identity with credit cards?
Ask stores at which you are applying for credit how they safeguard credit applications. Ensure that they are treated as secure documents.

Ask businesses how they store and dispose of credit card transaction skips. Ensure that proper safeguards are in place to treat these documents securely.

Never giver credit card numbers or other personal information over the phone unless you initiate the call. Even if you initiate the call, ensure that called party is not using a cellular or other mobile phone.

The information about Identity Theft presented here will do one of two things: either it will reinforce what you know about Identity Theft or it will teach you something new. Both are good outcomes.

Carry only the credit cards needed for the current trip. Most people carry all their credit cards with them at all times.

The garbage bags are not secure place for old or pre-approved cards. Tear them up before throwing them away. Thieves can retrieve these documents and open credit accounts with new addresses.

Keep a list or photocopy of all credit accounts, along with expiration dates and phone numbers to call in case of theft. Keep this list in a secure spot at home.

When you purchase items with credit, always take your credit card receipts with you. Never toss them in a waste basket.

Do not have boxes of new checks delivered to your home. Arrange to pick them up at the bank or credit union.

Do not write credit card numbers on checks.

If you have applied for a new credit card and it does not arrive, contact the issuer.

Avoid giving credit card numbers over the phone if you are in a public place. Even at work, others may overhear and use the information.

About the Author
By Suraya – Your main sources and articles. Share your opinion and advice here!

PostHeaderIcon Protecting Identity is More Than Protecting Individuality

Do you remember that Hollywood blockbuster several years ago involving a woman that needed to keep running because of a compromised identity with information taken from the Internet? Or more recently, there was yet another Hollywood offering that shows a regular family man’s ideal home and family turned into a suspense-filled arena for a bank heist because of sensitive information gathered from the family trash?

Although, as the disclaimer at the end of these films say, these stories are fictitious, there is indeed cause for alarm for things like these happening to you. Identity theft is a growing problem and once you’ve been victimized, a whole slew of difficulties will arise from this crisis.

Don’t panic just yet though. Note that from these movies you will see that these types of identity thefts are done with precision and motive. Meaning, when identity theft to that magnitude happens, it is usually committed by someone who knows your personal habits and may not be a serial identity theft. That means, you need to safe guard against friends or family that may have a drug problem or are in dire financial straits. Suspicious of you to think this way sure but as the cliché goes, it is better to be safe than sorry, and believe me, sorry is the least of your worries if you become the hapless victim of identity theft.

Just think-if your wallet was stolen or you have for one reason or another, been physically separated from items that contain sensitive information like your social security number, credit card information, driver’s license number, etc– it is easy to prevent identity theft because you can cancel all your cards and report them stolen to prevent anyone misusing your personal information for their gain.

Now imagine this-you are hounded by credit collectors for purchases you have not made, or worse-you are wrongfully apprehended for a crime you most certainly did not commit. How did this happen? Your personal information and sensitive numbers were never physically separated from you. Unfortunately, carelessly giving away your social security number or other sensitive information may put you at risk for identity theft.

The information about Identity Theft presented here will do one of two things: either it will reinforce what you know about Identity Theft or it will teach you something new. Both are good outcomes.

A database with all your information may be sold to another entity that may use your data to make purchases in your stead without you knowing. It’s easy enough if the criminals who commit identity theft will make purchases on your existing credit cards and such. You can easily check your existing credit cards and see fraudulent purchases.

What about checking the accounts that you don’t know about?

Identity thefts may open new accounts for mobile phones, credit cards and even make larger purchases like buying an apartment and you won’t know it unless the credit collectors finally trace the bills back to you after the perpetrators run off with the bills.

Therefore, identity theft protection is important, as you have now surmised. Although as in everything in life (another cliché coming), prevention is the best cure. Given this, it is important to find out the best ways to prevent and protect yourself against identity theft. Fortunately, you can get extremely useful information on this online through websites like www.crimedoctor.com

This website is a rich resource for anything and everything about identity theft and how to protect yourself against it. This site has a very useful article on identity theft written for lay people like you and me so that you can guard yourself by learning more.

That’s how things stand right now. Keep in mind that any subject can change over time, so be sure you keep up with the latest news.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, proud owner of this top ranked web hosting reseller site: GVO

PostHeaderIcon Questions From an Identity Theft Victim

The following article presents the very latest information on Identity Theft. If you have a particular interest in Identity Theft, then this informative article is required reading.

Identity theft is a crime in which the imposter obtains key pieces of information such as Social Security and driver’s license numbers to obtain credit, merchandise and services in the name of the victim.

The victim is left with a ruined credit history and the time-consuming and complicated task of regaining financial health. The imposter may even use the victim’s good name for criminal activities. It is a dual crime because not only is it committed against an individual’s financial life and credit history but also against his or her reputation and social standing in the community and in the workplace.

In one notorious case of identity theft, a convicted felon have not only incurred thousands of credit card debt by using another person’s identity, he was also able to obtain a federal home loan, and even bought homes, motorcycles, and handguns using the victim’s name. What is even more frustrating is that the felon even called his victim to taunt him — saying that he could continue to assume the victim’s identity for as long as he wanted because identity theft was not a federal crime at that time. After which, the felon even filed for bankruptcy, also in the victim’s name.

While the victim and his wife spent more than four years and more than $15,000 of their own money to restore their credit and reputation, the criminal served a brief sentence for making a false statement to procure a firearm, but made no restitution to his victim for any of the harm he had caused.

How do thieves get my information?

• They go through your trashcan, looking for straight cut or unshredded papers.

• They steal your mail or your wallet.

• They listen in on conversations you have in public.

• They trick you into giving them the information over the telephone or by email.

• They buy the information either on the Internet or from someone who might have stolen it.

• They steal it from a loan or credit application form you filled out or from files at a hospital, bank, school or business that you deal with. They may have obtained it from dumpsters outside of such companies.

• They get it from your computer, especially those without firewalls.

Now that we’ve covered those aspects of Identity Theft, let’s turn to some of the other factors that need to be considered.

• They may be a friend or relative or someone who works for you who has access to your information

Tips to Consumers:

How can I prevent identity theft? While no one can totally prevent this crime from occurring, here are some tips that can help you decrease your risk.

• Check your credit reports once a year from all three of the credit reporting agencies listed below.

• Guard your Social Security number. When possible, don’t carry your Social Security card with you.

• Don’t put your SSN or drivers license number on your checks.

• Guard your personal information. You should never give your Social Security number to anyone unless they have a good reason for needing it.

• Watch for people who may try to eavesdrop and overhear the information you give out orally.

• Carefully destroy the documents that you throw out, especially those with sensitive or identifying information. A crosscut paper shredder works best.

• Be suspicious of telephone solicitors that call you at your office. Never provide information unless you have initiated the call.

• Delete and do not reply to any suspicious email requests.

• Use a locked mailbox at your home to send and receive all mails.

• Make an effort to reduce the number of preapproved credit card offers that you receive.

About the Author
About the Author By Janet Matthews, feel free to visit her site on how to manage Student Loan Debt

PostHeaderIcon Can You Stop Credit Card Identity Theft?

Credit card identity theft can be a very costly problem. In today’s world of increasing credit card usage, it is no longer a rare instance where a criminal may be able to make use of your credit card for his own gain. He does not need to have your “plastic” in order to commit such a crime. All he needs will be your number and your personal information. Such a crime has been known as identity theft.

Credit card identity theft can happen in a variety of ways. Almost everyone using a credit card can be an unwilling victim. With all business and financial transactions done through computers and online means, it has made information very valuable as well as very vulnerable to theft. Your personal information has become a very valuable asset.

Anyone who can get hole of it can use it to their advantage at your very expense. Identity theft is basically the act of using your personal information without your knowledge to commit fraud or other crimes. On credit card identity theft, it could mean that such criminals can use your account for their own purchases.

How can such crime happen to someone like you? If you use your credit card on your regular purchases, there are a lot of chances that criminal can get hole of your credit and personal records. If you handout your credit card to servers at restaurants, you might be making yourself vulnerable to identity theft. If you sign your credit cards, criminals may be able to make use of your signature to commit a variety of crimes under your name.

Your personal information should be on your own safeguard because a lot of crimes can be committed using your own records. It can be as easy as calling your own credit card issuer to change your billing address once they get hole of your credit card information. The impostor can then run charges on your account without you even knowing it because your bills are being sent to a different address.

Hopefully the information presented so far has been applicable. You might also want to consider the following:

With your stolen credit information in the wrong hands, impostors may also be able to open new credit card accounts in your own name. When using these credit cards and foot the bill in your name, such delinquencies will be reported on your credit report.

This will make it harder for you to upgrade or make effective use of your own credit account because of your worsening credit record without you even knowing it. It can even go as far as using your name to the police during an arrest. If they do not appear in court to answer the charges, a warrant of arrest can be issued on your name and sent to your address.

Identity theft can be a very disturbing and costly problem. It is all the more important of trying to safeguard your credit information from getting into the wrong hands. You must try not to give your personal information to anybody without checking out on them. Make sure that you trust your personal records only to people and institutions that you can trust. Take the necessary precautions on making sure that you still have control of your credit accounts.

Always be aware of your credit reports and see to it that you are aware of anything out of the ordinary that may come up on your credit records such as purchases that you haven’t made yourself. Try to report any discrepancies immediately to the authorities. You can even have your account temporarily blocked in order to prevent further losses.

Do not forget to report it to the fraud agencies in your area so that everything can be done to apprehend and arrest the offenders as early as possible. Remember, the way you give out your personal information can have its corresponding consequences. Always be careful and be on the alert before you ever regret what you might have done.

Don’t limit yourself by refusing to learn the details about Identity Theft. The more you know, the easier it will be to focus on what’s important.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, now offering the host then profit baby plan for only $1 over at Host Then Profit

PostHeaderIcon What is Identity Theft?

Identity theft is a crime. Identity theft is a term used to refer to all types of crime in which someone illegally obtains and uses another person’s personal data in a way that involves lies or deception, mostly for economic gain.

Identity thefts is one of the fastest growing crimes in the country and what can be really frustrating about this is that you cannot really know how fast it is growing. Not only are identity theft cases hard to solve, they are also hard to detect. There are identity crimes that are not solved until after a decade because of the lack of information. Remember that though these crimes may be easily detected through credit card purchases, there are some con artists that do not use that avenue. What they do is just assume your name and personal history and use it as their own.

Unlike your fingerprints, which is impossible to copy, your personal data especially your Social Security number, your bank account or credit card number, your telephone number, and other identifyable data can be used, if they fall into the wrong hands.

In the United States and Canada, for example, many people have reported that unauthorized persons have taken funds out of their bank or financial accounts and in the worst cases, took over their identities, obtaining huge debts and committing crimes while using the victims’s names. In these cases, the victim’s losses may include not only financial losses, but additional financial costs associated with trying to restore his reputation.

If you base what you do on inaccurate information, you might be unpleasantly surprised by the consequences. Make sure you get the whole Identity Theft story from informed sources.

In recent years, the Internet has become the perfect place for criminals to obtain personal data, such as passwords or even banking information. In their haste to explore the exciting features of the Internet, many people respond to “spam” unsolicited E-mail that promises them some benefit but requests identifying data, without realizing that in many cases, the requester has no intention of keeping his promise. In some cases, criminals reportedly have used computer technology to obtain large amounts of personal data.

If you have received mailed in applications for “preapproved” credit cards, but have thrown them in the garbage can without tearing up the enclosed materials, criminals may retrieve them from the trash and activate them without your knowledge. (Some credit card companies, when sending credit cards, have adopted security measures that allow a card recipient to activate the card only from his or her home telephone number but this is not yet a universal practice.) Also, if your mail is delivered to a place where others have ready access to it, criminals can just intercept and redirect your mail to another location so that they will receive them.

With enough identifying information, a criminal can assume an individual’s identity and conduct a wide range of crimes: for example, applications for loans and credit cards, withdrawals from bank accounts, use of telephone calling cards, or obtaining other goods or privileges which the criminal might be denied if he were to use his real name.

If the criminal takes steps to ensure that bills for the falsely obtained credit cards, or bank statements showing the unauthorized withdrawals, are sent to an address other than the victim’s, the victim may not even be aware of what is happening until it is much too late when the criminal has done much damage to the victim’s assets, credit, and reputation.

Now might be a good time to write down the main points covered above. The act of putting it down on paper will help you remember what’s important about Identity Theft.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his soon to be top ranked Perpetual20 training site: Perpetual 20